Chicagomuzik

I've got a whole city to hold down

November 16, 2004

Wilco articles #8,457,921 and 8,457,922, respectively

Wired News: What if the efforts to stop unauthorized music file sharing are successful? How would that change culture?

Jeff Tweedy: If they succeed, it will damage the culture and industry they say they're trying to save. What if there was a movement to shut down libraries because book publishers and authors were up in arms over the idea that people are reading books for free? It would send a message that books are only for the elite who can afford them. Stop trying to treat music like it's a tennis shoe, something to be branded. If the music industry wants to save money, they should take a look at some of their six-figure executive expense accounts. All those lawsuits can't be cheap, either. ... Treating your audience like thieves is absurd. Anyone who chooses to listen to our music becomes a collaborator. People who look at music as commerce don't understand that. They are talking about pieces of plastic they want to sell, packages of intellectual property. I'm not interested in selling pieces of plastic."

- from Wired.com, 11/15/04


"'You guys are being cast on the Internets,' Tweedy grinned at one point [in concert Monday in San Francisco], reminding the crowd of the concert's Webcast. 'Say hello to the folks in cyberspace.' The crowd roared its approval. 'Cyberspace is definitely a blue state,' he added. ...

"As the two-hour-plus show throttled to a close (one guy behind me exclaimed, "They don't have any songs left!") the minor psychedelia of lights playing against the stage backdrop morphed into a few seconds of dark footage -- the big bad fella himself. There he was, in all his smirking glory, Dubya. And sure enough, he was firing off that infamous one-fingered victory salute.

"Bush's mug, of course, set up what was perhaps the best political barb of the evening. The band proceeded to bid farewell by laying into Blue Oyster Cult's 'Don't Fear the Reaper.'

"That signature, snarling guitar line never sounded quite so good."
- from Salon.com, 11/16/04